CSA Updates

2020 Summer Fruit Share


This week's share

September 14-18

Lindentree Farm, Newton Community Farm, Drumlin Farm, Medway Community Farm, Stearns Farm

Two thoroughly modern varieties!  Honeycrisp apples and Sugar Giant white peaches. A popular “new” variety, Honeycrisp was produced in 1960 from a cross of Macoun and Honeygold, as part of the University of Minnesota apple breeding program. The original seedling was planted in 1962 at the University of Minnesota Horticultural Research Center and the resulting fruit is creamy, flavorful and juicy!  The Honeycrisp is actually protected under a patent and anyone wishing to propagate the variety must apply for a license. 

The Sugar Giant peach is a white peach and a subacid type which makes it less tannic in flavor.  Patented in 1993 the Sugar Giant was developed by Floyd Zaiger, a prolific stone fruit breeder in Modesto, California, who is renowned among fruit growers for having developed scores of new varieties of peaches, plums and other stone fruit.  Mr. Zaiger also developed the Pluot — a cross between a plum and apricot.  We like the Sugar Giant’s mellow flavor and delicate color and are grateful for Mr. Zaiger’s efforts and accomplishments as a modern fruit pioneer.  


September 7-11

Lindentree Farm, Newton Community Farm, Drumlin Farm

Gala apples, Red Gold nectarines (or peaches for some) and Bartlett Pears.  Pears ripen off the tree. They are hard and green when picked but let them ripen at room temperature and they will mellow and soften.  Pears are ready to eat when the flesh at the base of the stem gives ever-so-slightly to a bit of pressure.  The Gala apples are small this year.  Snackable and sweet.  Red Gold nectarines are sweet and tangy.  

Medway Community Farm, Stearns Farm

Ginger Gold apples, Red Gold nectarines and Somerset grapes.  Somerset grapes were developed by University of Minnesota as a cold-hearty table grape.  We love their color and flavor.  Like little jewels!  Ginger Gold applea are a great, early, all-purpose apple.  Excellent for cooking and eating but as a summer apple we mostly eat them as it’s still too warm to think about much baking and dessert making.  

 

September 2-6: Apples and nectarines (or peaches, perhaps) 

 Ginger Gold and Gravenstein apples.  Plus a few yellow peaches or little “Red Gold” nectarines.

Gravenstein was a popular variety in the 19th Century in the U.S.  Originally identified in Austria and widely cultivated in Denmark, Gravenstein is known as the national apple of Denmark! Much of Sonoma County in California was planted in Gravenstein for processing. Nowadays one sees vineyards along the “Gravenstein Highway” where orchards used to be.  Great for baking, they are flavorful and firm.   

 Ginger Gold is a modern variety, introduced in the 1980’s.  It was a wild apple “sport” found on a farm in Virginia.  It’s crisp and flavorful — especially for an early “summer” apple.  GG’s are great for eating and cooking and we are always happy to serve them up in late August.  

Note on Nectarines: A few share members may have peaches in your bag.  We’ll do our best to get you some nectarines next week.  It’s been challenging with weather and harvesting to provide uniform shares across the entire week — but we are trying! 

Note for some Medway Community Farm Saturday (9/5) pick ups:  There may be a substitution of Paula Red in your bag instead of Gravenstein.  Paula Reds are a relative of Macinstosh but are harvested earlier. They are juicy, and sweetly mild without the tart finish of a Mac.  We like our Paula Reds cold out of the frig.  They are the perfect “kid snack” or lunchbox apple.  A great summer apple! 

 
 August 27: for Lindentree Farm

This week brings more Ginger Gold apples, plus a few tart Gravenstein apples and Red Haven peaches.  Gravenstein was a popular variety in the 19th Century in the U.S.  Originally identified in Austria and widely cultivated in Denmark, Gravenstein is known as the national apple of Denmark! Much of Sonoma County in California was planted in Gravenstein for processing. Nowadays one sees vinyards along the “Gravenstein Highway” where orchards used to be.  Great for baking, they are flavorful and firm.  

August 26: for Drumlin Farm
Peach-a-palooza! Peaches were in abundance this week so your share is nothing but Red Haven peaches.  We figured we might as well share the wealth as you’ll receive your share of apples in good time!  Most of your share is ready/ripe but you might find a few that will reach peak in a day or two.  Enjoy the bonanza!
 
August 19: Peaches and Gold

Finally the yellow peaches are ready!  They’ve taken their sweet time, likely due to the dry weather we’ve had. The peaches are small but we like their bite-sized proportions.  You don’t need a friend to share these 2020 summer peaches!  The varieties picked this week are Red Haven and Starfire.  They are very similar, and frankly, we can’t tell one from the other looking at them.  We just want to eat them all.  

Ginger Gold apples are here! Ginger Gold is a modern variety, introduced in the 1980’s.  It was a wild apple “sport” found on a farm in Virginia.  It’s crisp and flavorful — especially for an early “summer” apple.  GG’s are great for eating and cooking and we are always happy to serve them up in late August.  

 
August 12:  A bit of stop and go! 

This is an “off week” for us here at Autumn Hills. The start of the season is a little bit “stop and go.”  We have some fruit in August but not a steady flow of crops to harvest.  So.. this week is a bit of a reprise with some more Shiro and Methley plums, Silver Gem nectarines, plus a few early Jersey Mac apples and a “peach preview” of things to come.  If your share seems a bit short, we’ll make it up to you soon as our bounty increases.  

 

August 5:  A Summer Medley

 Silver Gem is a variety of white nectarine  developed by pomologists at Rutgers University. We love its intense perfume and delicate flavor.  The skin imparts a wonderful red veining in the fruit making it very pretty in salads or sliced fresh.  These nectarines are small this year due to the drought conditions but they are tasty!  

Our blueberries are a mixture of varieties as we grow about 4 different variety bushes.  Blueberries are usually reserved for PYO customers, but we have an abundance this week so we picked some for our CSA customers as well.

Yellow Transparent apple is a Russian variety that was imported by USDA in the late 19th Century specifically for cultivation in the upper mid-west orchards of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.  Cold-hardy and early, the Yellow Transparent is a soft-fleshed apple, best for cooking and sauce — but we enjoy its tangy flavor in summer salads, too.  So different from the crisp fall apples we are used to in New  England, but we’ll take the YT as the first apple of summer!

We added a few apricots and some Japanese Methley plums.  We hope you enjoy our summer sampler!